Stars and Stripes: Americana Week in NYC

Americana week is about to commence in New York City. During this week in January NYC’s major auction houses will be conducting their most important sales of American art and furniture and throughout the city numerous lectures, antique shows, exhibitions, and other events regarding American art will take place. I myself have a fondness for 18th and early 19th century American furniture and I find the quirky qualities of American paintings such as tinsel painting so interesting and beautiful, it could be the old soul in me or maybe a certain nostalgia for these objects that surrounded me in my childhood home. Early American art, I feel, has been overlooked for the most part by our younger generation, some might think this kind of furniture and art is best suited for their grandmother’s house; but whether you like it or not American art holds a tremendous amount of history. As we separated ourselves from England and the rest of Europe an American style of furniture, painting, and crafts emerged that was all our own. Here are some wonderful examples of American furniture, crafts, and fine art as well as some highlights from Americana week in New York.

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Folk Art

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Artist unidentified, reverse painting and foil on glass with lithograph, c. 1850, American Folk Art Museum

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Sophy Regensburg, Red Collage, c. 1965. American Folk Art Museum

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Ammi Phillips, Girl in a Red Dress, c.1835

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Phrenological Head, Attributed to Asa Ames (1823–1851), paint on wood, c.1850, American Folk Art Museum

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Artist unidentified, Glazed red earthenware, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, c.1790, American Folk Art Museum

William and Mary  (1620 – 1730)

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Room and staircase from the John Wentworth House, 1695–1700, Portsmouth, New Hampshire

Queen Anne (1730 – 1760)

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side chair, walnut, yellow pine, Philadelphia, 1740 – 60

Chippendale (1760 – 1785)

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side chair, mahogany, yellow pine, 1765 – 75

Federal (1785 – 1815)

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Parlor from the James Duncan Jr. House, Haverill, Massachusetts, ca. 1805

Grab your paddles and put on your walking shoes because here is a round-up of impressive auction highlights (you could bid on) from Christie’s and Sotheby’s and a list of several antique shows around town that you should be sure browse through…

Auctions:

Christie’s

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An Important Chippendale Carved Mahogany Block-and-Shell Bureau Table, signed by John Townsend (1733-1809) Newport, circa 1770, Estimate:  $700,000 – $900,000

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A Queen Anne Carved Maple Armchair, attributed to John Gaines III (1704-1743), Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1735-1743, Estimate: $200,000 – $300,000

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A Rare Silver Tea Pot, Mark of Paul Revere Jr., Boston, Circa 1782, Estimate: $150,000 – $250,000

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Silk and Metallic-Thread Needlework Pictorial on Linen, worked by Nancy Winsor (1778-1850), School of  Mary Balch, Providence, Rhode Island, dated December 4, 1786, Estimate: $80,000 – $120,000

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Edward Hicks (1780 – 1849), Penn’s Treaty, Estimate: $600,000 – $900,000

Sotheby’s

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A very fine and rare Chippendale carved mahogany easy chair, Philadelphia, circa 1755, Estimate: $800,000 – 1,200,000

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An American silver and copper large “Japanesque” water pitcher, Edward C. Moore for Tiffany & Co., New York, Circa 1875, Estimate: $20,000 – 25,000

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The Potts family Chippendale carved and highly figured mahogany scroll-top desk-and-bookcase with bust of John Locke, Philadelphia, circa 1770, Estimate: $200,000 – 400,000

Events:

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New York Ceramics Fair, January 22 – 27, 2013  admission: $20

59th Annual Winter Antiques Show, January 25 – February 3, 2013  admission: $20

Antiques at the Armory, January 25 – 27, 2013  admission: $15, ages 16 and younger free

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