Remembering Richard Artschwager 12.26.1923 – 2.9.2013

With the recent news of artist Richard Artschwager’s death on Saturday February 9, 2013 at the age of 89, I thought it fitting to look back upon his artistic career and remember Richard Artschager through his art. Associated with the Pop Art movement, Conceptual art and Minimalism, the paintings, drawings, and sculptures of Richard Artschwager are a clever mix of many art genres and styles. His works ranging in medium, continually changed throughout his career, from architectural assemblages rooted in domestic interiors to black and white paintings of found photographs, Artschwager’s works exemplify his artistic multifariousness. Throughout his long career, beginning in the early 1960’s, Artschwager’s work has been concerned with themes such as perception of space and fragmentation and expansion. It is greatly apparent in pieces such as Table with Pink Tablecloth (1964) and Splatter Chair I (1992) that Artschwager is questioning our physical relationship to and visual perception of these well known everyday objects. Artschwager’s clever inventiveness and maverick attitude has made him revered by artists and critics alike. His work has been shown by a multitude of notable galleries and is in numerous museum collections such as The Museum of Modern Art, New York and the  Museum für Moderne Kunst, Frankfurt. With a timely ending, less than a week before Artschwager’s death, The Whitney Museum of American Art concluded their retrospective of Richard Artschwager’s artistic career, celebrating and honoring this truly amazing artist.

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Richard Artschwager, 1985, photograph by: Peter Sumner Walton Bellamy

Let’s look back at Richard Artschwager’s long career from 1962 – 2008.

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Seated Group, 1962. Charcoal and synthetic polymer paint on Celotex, 42 x 60″

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Table and Chair, 1963-64, melamine and wood

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Portrait II, 1963. Formica on wood, 68 × 26 × 13 in

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Table with Pink Tablecloth, 1964, Formica on wood, 78.8 x 93.9 x 93.9 cm.

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Construction with Indentation, 1966. Melamine laminate on plywood, 59 7/8 × 47 15/16 × 9 9/16 in

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Logus (Blue Logus), 1967. Wood/Formica, 35 × 45 1/2 × 48 in.

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Locations, 1969. Formica on wood, and five blps made of wood, glass, Plexiglas, mirror and rubberized horsehair with Formica box, dimensions variable.

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Interior,1972,  Screenprint, composition (right): 28 3/4 x 19 9/16″; composition (left): 28 5/16 x 19 9/16″

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Interior #2, 1977, Drypoint, plate: 9 15/16 x 11 15/16″; sheet: 22 3/8 x 19 13/16″

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Untitled (Project for Hamburg),1978, Gelatin silver print (with paper collage and graphite), 14 3/4 x 19 3/4″

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Untitled,1979. Aquatint, etching and roulette, plate: 9 x 10 3/4″

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Door/Door II, 1984-85, wood

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Double Sitting,1988. Synthetic polymer paint on composition board and paint on formica, 6′ 3 3/8″ x 67 7/8″

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Untitled,1990. Lithograph with aquatint, composition: 11 5/16 x 14 7/8″

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The White Cherokee, 1991. Acrylic and Formica on Celotex with metal frame, 57 1/2 × 89 in.

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Splatter Chair I, 1992. Enamel on wood and formica, Overall 53 x 42 1/8 x 38 3/4″

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Untitled, 1994. Wood and metal, 6′ 8″ x 29″ x 12 1/2″

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High Backed Chair, 1998. Rubberized Hair, 74 x 42 x 50″

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Haltestelle I, 2001. Charcoal and pastel on paper, 23 x 31 3/4″

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Untitled (Road with Trees), 2003. Charcoal on paper, 38 × 25 in.

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In the Driver’s Seat, 2008. Oil pastel on paper, 25 × 38 in

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Exclamation Point (Chartreuse), 2008. Plastic bristles on a mahogany core painted with latex, 65 × 22 × 22 in.

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Richard Artschwager with his “Door,” from 1983-84, photograph by Ben Blackwell

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