Painter’s Painter: Andrew Masullo

‘Eye candy’ is the first phrase that comes to mind while looking at the poppy little paintings of Andrew Masullo.  A friend of mine was fortunate enough to see these little gems in person at Mary Boone Gallery in New York (on display until April 27, 2013) and fell in love. It is at these times when I wish I was closer to the city! Here is a smattering of a few works currently on view in the exhibition, as well as more works by Masullo.

1

5363, 2011, oil on canvas, 20 x 24 in

Each intimately scaled painting is a glorious arrangement of color, geometric forms, and textures that creates a dynamic optical interplay. By utilizing pre-streched canvases and unmixed oil paints Masullo aims to create pure paintings devoid of conceptual premise or premeditated thought.

One of Masullo’s influences are the enigmatic paintings of Forrest Bess, which he first saw in 1981 while employed as an administrative secretary at the Whitney. Coincidentally, Masullo was fired from this job because of his greater interest in the artwork on the walls than the work on his desk; ironically years later he was included in the 2012 Whitney Biennial. Masullo stated about this twist of fate:

“When I got fired from the Whitney,” he said, “I told myself, ‘They’re kicking me out the back door, but one day they’re going to invite me in through the front.’ I didn’t know it was going to be 31 years, but I knew it would happen.”

Andrew Masullo, born in Elizabeth New Jersey,  currently lives and works in San Francisco. He attended Rutgers University and graduated with a BA in Studio Art. He has had solo exhibitions at André Emmerich Gallery (1994, 1996), Joan Washburn Gallery (2000, 2002, 2004), and Feature Inc. (2010), all in New York; Thomas Ammann Fine Art, Zurich (1999); Gallery Paule Anglim, San Francisco (2000, 2006, 2008, 2012); Daniel Weinberg Gallery, Los Angeles (2007, 2009, 2011); Steven Zevitas Gallery, Boston (2007, 2011) and Texas Gallery, Houston (2009). Masullo was the recipient of a 2011 Guggenheim Foundation fellowship.

2

5378, 2011-2012, oil on canvas, 24 x 20 in

3

5369, 2011, oil on canvas, 20 x 24 in

5

5525, 2012, oil on canvas, 22 x 28 in

2-1

5382, 2011, oil on canvas, 12 x 16 in

install

Installation at Mary Boone Gallery

Here is a short chronology of some of Masullo’s other color-centric paintings…

5884693158_525313f584_z

4469, 2005, oil on canvas, 12 x 16 in.

Screen shot 2013-03-18 at 6.15.06 PM

4494, 2005, oil on canvas, 10 x 8 in

Screen shot 2013-03-18 at 8.08.31 PM

4493, 2005oil on canvas, 10 x 8 in

Screen shot 2013-03-18 at 6.13.39 PM

4537, 2006, oil on canvas, 14 x 18 in

Screen shot 2013-03-18 at 8.08.03 PM

4549, 2006, oil on canvas, 20 x 24 in

amf4993

4993, 2008-09, oil on canvas, 12 x 16 in

Image

5001, 2010*, oil on canvas, 14 x 18 in

Image

5032, 2010oil on canvas, 24 x 30 in

Image

5244, 2010, oil on canvas, 22 x 28 in

Screen shot 2013-03-18 at 6.19.58 PM

5260, 2010-11, oil on canvas, 20 by 16 in

Screen shot 2013-03-18 at 8.12.16 PM

5347, 2011*oil on canvas, 20 x 16 in

6871353365_675c02bdd6_z

5365, 2011*, oil on canvas, 8 x 10 in

{Steven Zevitas Gallery}

{* exact dates not found, estimated chronology}

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3 comments on “Painter’s Painter: Andrew Masullo

  1. If you’re going to review a show, then illustrate that review with paintings that are appear IN that show!! Why would you review a show taking place in 2013 and illustrate it with paintings made years before?? With the exception of the last jpeg showing the Mary Boone gallery walls, NONE of the paintings appearing in this review are recent! Three of them (4469, 4493, 4494) date all the way back to 2005!! 4537 and 4549 were made in 2006!! This anonymous reviewer us provides the titles and dimensions for each painting and lets us know they are made with oil paint, but for some reason fails to provide us with the dates that these paintings were made. I stretches credulity to think he just kinda forgot to include the dates. It also stretches credulity to think that someone would review a 2013 show and illustrate with 2005 paintings.

    • Thank you for voicing your concerns, I plan on addressing them promptly. However, I feel there was a misunderstanding between my intentions for this post and what you took from it. I did not intend for this post to be a critical review of the exhibition at Mary Boone Gallery, since I didn’t have a chance to see the show in person and that would as you say question my, “credulity.” A friend of mine did, however, see the exhibition, which is how it was brought to my attention. I honestly, really like Andrew Masullo’s paintings and wanted to share works by this artists as a whole. I see now that I should have clarified this in the text and state that not all the works featured here appeared in the exhibition at Mary Boone. Possibly, in hindsight this was a poor decision on my part, so I will do my best to revamp this post. As to the dates, all images were cited from the two sources at the bottom of the post. I liked the range of Andrew Masullo’s work being represented at, Steven Zevitas Gallery, however the dates were not provided on their site either. It is not like me to not put dates alongside the work I write about, will search further for the correct dates of these paintings. Again, I apologize for the misleading nature of my post, it is a mistake I will be sure not to make again. I hope my misstep doesn’t ruin your perception of my blog, and you do visit back again (not all the posts are that bad…) Thanks for the criticisms, we all need them sometimes, and this feedback will, no doubt help make my blog better in the future.
      Sincerely,
      Lydia

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